Understanding Cell Behaviour

  Cryo-fluorescence microscopy of the cells performed using the Linkam CMS196 stage

 

Cryo-fluorescence microscopy of the cells performed using the Linkam CMS196 stage

Linkam's CMS196 stage is being used to study cell behaviour by the London Research Institute of Cancer Research UK. 

In order for mammalian cells to remain healthy their components constantly have to be repaired or replaced. This constant upkeep is carried out in the cells through a process which is known as autophagy, from the Greek words auto “self” and phagein “eat”. As the name suggests, it involves the creation of a structure within the cell (the autophagosome) which breaks down and recycles old and dysfunctional components.

Autophagy plays a major role in a huge number of important cellular functions and any slight fault in this process can lead to neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.

With this catabolic mechanism being such a key part of the understanding of some cancers a team at the London Research Institute (LRI) of Cancer Research UK has been looking into how these autophagosomes are formed within the cells and how their functionality is directly linked to their external structure.

Dr Lucy Collinson in collaboration with Dr Sharon Tooze, both from the LRI, have recently used the Linkam CMS196 Cryo Correlative stage to help them study these cells in a new imaging technique called Cryo-Soft X-ray Microscopy (cryo-CLXM). This technique allows the cells to be visualised whilst keeping them in as natural a state as possible.

More about the technique and the findings of their study can be found in the following press release.  

By Ricky Patel