Lab of the Month: May 2018

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Chalmers University of Technology – Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
 

 Dr. Maths Karlsson (back left), Post Doc Mikael Andersson (front left), PhD. students Yuan-Chih Lin (back right) and Carin Eklöf-Österberg (front right), with their optical setup together with a Linkam system

Dr. Maths Karlsson (back left), Post Doc Mikael Andersson (front left), PhD. students Yuan-Chih Lin (back right) and Carin Eklöf-Österberg (front right), with their optical setup together with a Linkam system

Dr. Maths Karlsson is one of the research group leaders in the Division of Energy and Materials at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology since 2017. His research group focuses on investigating key fundamental properties of functional materials, mostly energy relevant oxides.

Their on-going projects involve different fields, such as materials for hydrogen storage, ionic conductors for solid oxide fuel cells, inorganic luminescent oxides (phosphors) for solid state white lighting devices, and so on. The major objective is to understand the mechanistic aspects of dynamical excitations, such as vibrations and diffusion, in relation to defects on the atomic length scale, and to correlate those microscopic properties to the functional macroscopic properties of the materials.

They use the Linkam THMS600, combined with a commercial Raman spectrometer and a home-made optical setup for performing different spectroscopic experiments, and synchrotron facilities for time-resolved experiments. These temperature-controlled experiments provide versatile means to probe static and dynamic states of the materials including crystal structure, vibrational modes and atom diffusion, and electronic structure. Their research findings will benefit the development of new energy materials for future “green” technologies, such as high-power light emitting diodes coated with single-phase phosphors of multi-colour light emissions sustaining high energy efficiency up to very high temperatures.